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Wisdom That Has Come to Me

"...being able to share with others my story showing there is hope, a light at the end of the tunnel, a certain wisdom that has come to me. Knowing nothing is perfect and that's OK —there are hurts and pit falls." —Karen Midwinter; St. Catharines, Ontario

Karen Midwinter; St. Catharines, Ontario


kmidwinterIn what ways have you found psychiatric medication(s) harmful, if any?

Destroyed parts of my system—a lot of times used for control which was unnecessary with dosages way to high as I have sensitivities to drugs—at times horrible reactions to them caused more problems then were present.

If you overcame hopelessness that you could get better from a mental health or emotional problem, was there a turning point for you?

There were many defining moments—my very first counselor was a women going through similar things. She planted a seed that took a long time blooming, and once in a while I would land a professional that believed me and believed in me leaving an abusive relationship and moving away from my roots my stubbornness—some of my personality's—my children friends and my risk taking in speaking out when ever possible. Also, stopping drugs alcohol and other destructive behaviors most of them by my self and personalities—I could not have done anything without my own "personal team."

Tell us what recovery means to you. How would you define recovery from mental health or emotional problems in your own words?

Freedom of choice, being accountable to my actions, words etc. as well to my self, celebrating each moment, each step, each fall, being gentle to myself (need reminders for that), being the best grandmother and life coach I Can be —being able to share with others my story showing there is hope, a light at the end of the tunnel, a certain wisdom that has come to me. Knowing nothing is perfect and that's OK —there are hurts and pit falls. I can come out of them, relapse is OK—I am a child at heart and like to play. Two sayings I live by—“why be normal” (what ever that is ) as well as Gandhi's saying "we must be the change we wish to see." I have built my small Life Coaching around this one, I can give hope to others as well to my family.

If you could send a brief message to someone receiving mental health care today who is feeling hopeless about getting better, what would you say?

Anything is possible —we have to do it for ourselves inside, no one will rescue us. We have the power go for it—baby steps. Re-frame the moment—have fun.

Can you give examples showing you have gotten better from a mental or emotional problem, such as how you are doing well or accomplishing goals you have chosen?

I am 65 and still setting goals —I had wonderful jobs, still looking for more. Lost two houses, realized now they were only a house, not a home. I try to stay educated in the mental health field, etc. Empowerment is very important to me. I have been able to turn awful, sad losses into positiveness—taking accountability into my part/role of the failure and over time realizing that it was not me or it was not all me that caused that chaos. I garden, play, exercise, no matter what I smile at people. [I have] new goals all the time—I hold onto the thought that there is purpose for me to be still here.

 

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I Got Better is a project of MindFreedom International    Domain generously contributed by United by Humanity.